Getting toad-smart: Endangered mammal learns to avoid lethal prey introduced by humans

Humans have transported plants and animals all over the world, causing dramatic habitat changes. In Australia, the human introduction of cane toads has caused devastating population losses for many Australian predators. Cane toads are deadly prey because their skin produces a lethal toxin. Can Australian predators learn to avoid this new lethal prey and avoid extinction?

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Wildfires Are Shaping Our Ecosystems: One Species They Affect and How

Disturbances that occur around us help shape our world; from spilling a cup of coffee, to a natural disaster. During the past few decades we’ve experienced a lot more of the latter: from Katrina to tornados in the eastern US, severe natural disturbances are on the rise. One of those disturbances is wildfire. Over the last couple of decades wildfires have increased in intensity and scale. While this is alarming to our safety and infrastructure, wildfires play an important role and are necessary for various organisms. Of the many organisms that live in and rely on forest communities that are susceptible to wildfire disturbances, one of major interest is the northern spotted owl.

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Of feces and fertilizer: residential sources of urban water pollutants

Excess nutrients from pet waste and lawn fertilizer contribute to degraded water quality in cities. Due to the widely dispersed nature of these pollutants in residential areas, decisions made at the household level can go a long way towards solving—or exacerbating—water quality problems.

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What’s that smell? Investigating a new method for reducing emissions from manure lagoons.

What happens when a cow on a farm poops? You may not want to think about it, but all of that waste on animal farms has to go somewhere. Oftentimes it is stored in outdoor areas known as manure lagoons that can release gas emissions. Dougherty et al. investigates biochar covers as a method for reducing these gas emissions.

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