A Day in the Life of a Parasite: Using Parasites to Describe Fish Movement

When you think of parasites, your first thoughts probably aren’t “helpful” or “useful.” However, parasites aren’t just something we try to get rid of; they can be studied and used in all kinds of applications, including conservation. Check out this article to learn more about how scientists are using parasites to track species movements around the world.

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Using Plants to Protect the Past

A new study found that plants that are culturally significant to Native American tribes are abundant near archeological sites in Bears Ears National Monument suggesting that historical human behavior is still shaping our ecosystems today. Now, we need to use our resources to protect this cultural and ecological legacy and educate others about the history of these ancestral lands.

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Metal Accumulation in Sharks of the Caribbean

Pollution threatens marine life worldwide. Some of this pollution includes metals that build up in the tissues of marine life, including sharks. People around the world consume shark meat as a part of their diets. Caribbean reef sharks are commonly consumed by people throughout the Caribbean and South America, but a study on metal levels in their tissues had never been done. A team of researchers undertook this study to assess the danger to people and to better identify sources of pollution so that marine pollution can be better managed.

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New Discovery of Microbes Gobbling Up Greenhouse Gases in Extreme Environments

A new group of microbes can eat up methane, a common component of greenhouse gas. Named for Dr. Thomas Brock, this new phylum sheds new light on the role microbes play in the global carbon cycle. This study demonstrates the astounding biodiversity of microbes in extreme environments and how tiny creatures shape our world.

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