Uncool beans: The future of coffee under climate change

A lot of people would say that a hot cup of coffee is a morning necessity, but a hotter future under climate change could mean trouble is brewing. In this study, scientists examined how rising temperatures might impact the growth of one of the major types of coffee produced in the world.

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“Mite”-y Mothers Protect Their Eggs from Drought

Mother’s Day is near, and what better way to celebrate than by learning about some “mite”-y moms! When predatory mite mothers are exposed to drought conditions, they prepare their eggs to survive stressful environments. In doing so, mite mothers exert more energy and resources which reduces the number of eggs that are produced and the time the mothers survive.

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Looking Ahead to the Past: Archeological Evidence Suggests Potential Solutions to Looming Climactic Challenges

Global warming is rapidly changing our planet which will impact the natural world as well as our daily life. Scientist are looking into the past to see if they can discover lessons on how to cope and survive extreme weather events. Recent archeological findings shed light on how the ancient people of Arabia dealt with changing climate over thousands of years.

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Turtle Hatch Rates Skyrocket after Incubation

Sea turtles are often seen as a “poster-child” animal for conservation efforts in coastal areas. Beaches are covered with signs, and local groups search every night for mothers’ nests so they can put up protective barriers and increase the hatching success. However, for other species of turtles, like the freshwater spiny softshell turtles (Apalone spinifera), simple protection of the nests are not currently an effective way to increase hatching success. Instead, researchers have found incubating the eggs of spiny softshell turtles more than doubled the hatching success rate, which may help save this endangered population in Québec, Canada.

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As Oceans Change, HABs Invade

Global ocean temperatures are currently rising and have been for decades. Scientists are working to discover how this changing climate affects species around the world, from the very large to the very small. This includes phytoplankton, the microscopic marine algae that live in most bodies of water around the globe and produce half the world’s oxygen. But some of these species are toxic, and can cause harm to human and wildlife alike if they are able to grow out of control. Though a number of studies have been undertaken to try and understand more about these harmful algal blooms, much is still unknown about their growth. A group of scientists were interested in how changing ocean temperatures affected the geographic ranges of harmful algal blooms over time in order to better predict blooms in the future.

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Coral reefs are in hot water: Could upwelling save the day?

Coral reefs do best in warm water, but when the water gets too hot, they bleach. Upwelling, which brings cooler water from the deeper parts of the ocean, occurs worldwide, including where coral reefs can be found. With climate change, ocean temperatures are increasing and coral bleaching events are happening more frequently. Could upwelling help protect coral reefs from hot water?

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Water vapor and Covid-19: The viral threat of cold, dry weather

Even before Covid-19, most people were acutely aware of the viral threat of winter. Seasonal colds seem to be more abundant during the winter while the widely broadcasted threat of flu season and subsequent chore of annual flu vaccinations are predictable components of late fall. However, I have also had my fair share of exceptional warm weather colds. I have encountered a collection of rumors as to why viral infections such as the common cold and influenza are statistically worse during the winter, but I have never really done enough research to actually believe any of them, or care, for that matter. Insert Covid-19.

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