Permanent urban resident edges out an urban newcomer

For many animals, life in the city is no easy task. However, some animals are able to exploit the features of the city and resulting in larger body sizes and more reproductive advantages compared to forest populations. Read more to find out whether a permanent urban resident and an urban newcomer both gain these advantages in the city.

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Fat and happy in the city

Wildlife may not always struggle when living in the city. For example, many birds and mammals benefit from access to human food and in some cases, encounter fewer predators in the city. Learning more about how wildlife deals with life in the city can help us learn what features of the city benefit or harm different species. Eastern chipmunks are abundant in both forest and urban habitats making them a suitable species to study to determine whether populations living in the city do better or worse. Researchers found that chipmunks in the city were fatter than forest chipmunks and less stressed, highlighting how some animals can thrive because of urbanization.

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Getting toad-smart: Endangered mammal learns to avoid lethal prey introduced by humans

Humans have transported plants and animals all over the world, causing dramatic habitat changes. In Australia, the human introduction of cane toads has caused devastating population losses for many Australian predators. Cane toads are deadly prey because their skin produces a lethal toxin. Can Australian predators learn to avoid this new lethal prey and avoid extinction?

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