Amazonian birds eavesdrop on antshrikes (Thamnomanes ardesiacus) to avoid predation

Neotropical birds can form flocks consisting of multiple species, but the birds that aren’t antshrikes benefit from the presence of these alarm-callers without returning the favor. How would they fare if the antshrikes weren’t around? An experimental study was conducted by Martinez et al. (2018) to determine just how much of an impact antshrikes have on the livelihood of other birds.

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Invasive ant species is forming supercolonies across southwestern British Columbia, Canada

Ant supercolonies are taking over southwestern British Columbia. A study published in the Journal of the Entomological Society of British Columbia late last year provides evidence of at least two supercolonies of an invasive ant species, Myrmica rubra, inhabiting BC. Evidence from behavioral experiments demonstrates that this ant species behaves as if it has formed up to five different supercolonies across seven regions of southwestern BC.

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The establishment of protected areas is influenced more by economics than the needs of threatened species

While the aim of creating protected areas is to conserve habitat that is necessary for the survival of threatened wildlife, historically these protected areas have been established on land that is deemed “economically marginal” — meaning that it is not especially valuable for activities that drive the economy, like agriculture or other human development. However, economically marginal land may not be where the greatest number of threatened species exist, actually the reality is quite the opposite.

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