Will the Eurasian tench (Tinca tinca) be the newest invader to wreak havoc in the Great Lakes?

The Great Lakes are a hot bed for invasions, and aquatic invasive species (AIS) from the world-over have ‘hitchhiked’ on shipping vessels, or have accidentally been released into the lakes over many years. AIS can severely affect the water quality, food-webs, nutrient cycling, and fish productivity of invaded waters. Notable examples in the Great Lakes basin include zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Asian carp (which actually consists of four species from the family Cyprinidae). In fact, up to now the Great Lakes have been invaded by at least 188 AIS, out of which 28 are fishes. In this paper Avlijaš and colleagues (2018) identify and review threats posed by the Eurasian tench (Tinca tinca), as they appear to be the most likely invader to expand into the basin next.

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Integrating human dimensions into large-scale marine conservation planning

In our efforts to safeguard vulnerable habitats from the multitude of threats currently facing our planet, oftentimes people get left out of the picture. Large-scale conservation efforts require the support of (especially local) communities to successfully meet their conservation objectives. Therefore, we need to seriously discuss ways to successfully incorporate human dimensions into large-scale conservation planning. In this paper, Christie et al. present some ideas on how we can ensure that large-scale conservation planning is mindful of human populations who might be impacted by new conservation areas.

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