City phosphorus, country phosphorus: can we mitigate P in different environments?

Phosphorus is essential for life, but there is such thing as too much of a good thing. In excess, phosphorus can cause algal blooms, creating dead zones in bodies of water. How do we prevent phosphorus from entering water systems? Katrina Macintosh and her team did a comprehensive review to track phosphorus from diffuse sources to find out.

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One man’s waste water is another man’s “accidental” wetland: How urban wetlands can revolutionize restoration

After the Salt River passes through the metropolitan area of Phoenix, AZ about 90% of the original water has been removed for human and agriculture use. Because of reduced water connectivity, similar to many urban streamside areas, plant and wildlife diversity in the Phoenix area have taken a big hit. “Accidental” wetlands forming along the river may be the money-saving restoration solution Phoenix, and hundreds of other cities, are looking for.

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Connecting to nature and understanding ecosystem services: the urban perspective

Food and water – two resources vital for life on Earth. These are two prime examples of the products that arise from ecosystem services. There are four broad categories of ecosystem services: provisioning regulating, supporting, and cultural. Food and water are a form of ecosystem service provisioning – these are the products that directly benefit humans. Globalization and climate change are increasingly threatening food and water security, and other vital ecosystem services throughout the world.

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Urban Environmental Science – why is it important and what is the big deal?

But let’s think about it. Over 50% of the global population currently resides in cities. Cities are seen as opportunity havens and projections suggest the global population living in cities will surpass 60% by 2050 (UN 2016). That’s a lot of people living on a relatively small area of land. Traditionally, we have created sanitary cities where the objective was to remove waste through engineered infrastructure (think sewers) and move water along controlled waterways (think channelized or buried streams). Nowadays, we are understanding the value of green areas in cities and are moving towards studying the urban environment to improve city design and make it more sustainable.

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