Timing is Everything: Sockeye Salmon Migration on the Skeena River

For most salmon to complete their life cycle, juveniles must migrate out to the ocean as “smolts”. They are then able to grow quickly by taking advantage of marine food sources, before they return as adults to spawn in the river where they were born. With climate change affecting environmental cues and conditions, the timing of their migration might not match up to the availability of crucial food resources, which could reduce smolt survival. Will this phenomenon affect the Skeena River populations of Sockeye Salmon? Read on to learn more!

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Invasive ant species is forming supercolonies across southwestern British Columbia, Canada

Ant supercolonies are taking over southwestern British Columbia. A study published in the Journal of the Entomological Society of British Columbia late last year provides evidence of at least two supercolonies of an invasive ant species, Myrmica rubra, inhabiting BC. Evidence from behavioral experiments demonstrates that this ant species behaves as if it has formed up to five different supercolonies across seven regions of southwestern BC.

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Homeward Bound: Salmon Straying in the Pacific Northwest

For salmon to complete their life cycle, juveniles must migrate out to the ocean and return as adults to spawn in the river where they were born. Adult salmon find their way back to their natal river after years at sea through a process called “homing”, a phenomenon that scientists still don’t fully understand. Some salmon never make it home at all, which can have lasting effects on populations. Read on to learn more!

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